Wind energy is booming around the world. In Spain and Denmark, wind energy provides 20 percent of the electricity supply and in Germany 10 percent. Experts predict that the figure will rise to between 20 and 25 percent in Germany by 2020.

According to statistics released by the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA), wind turbines with a total output capacity of around 40 gigawatts were newly deployed last year. By the end of 2011, global output was around 237 gigawatts. This equates to the energy output of around 280 nuclear power plants. To compare: there are currently some 380 nuclear power plants around the world – but that’s a figure which will diminish as nuclear power plants are decommissioned over the next few years.

Output to quadruple by 2020

The increase in capacity is proceeding quickly: every year there are 20 percent more turbines and the WWEA forecasts that output will quadruple to over 1,000 gigawatts by 2020.

Chinais taking a leading role in this process: in 2011, almost half of the new capacity was created there and it’s now ahead of both the US and Germany as the leading wind-energy nation in absolute terms. But EU countries like Denmark, Spain and Germany beat China on wind energy per head. Only 3 percent of China’s power comes from wind.

Cheap and clean

Wind energy is good for the environment and climate-friendly, but the reason for the worldwide boom is mainly the price. Electricity from wind turbines is often the cheapest source of energy. According to Stefan Gsänger, director of the WWEA, the current price for a kilowatt hour of electricity from new wind turbines on land is between 0.05 to 0.09 euros ($0.06 – $0.11). “That’s why wind energy is one of the most popular sources of energy,” Gsänger told DW.

Gsänger says wind energy still requires political support

In comparison, electricity from modern coal-burning power plants costs around 0.07 euros ($0.09) in Europe. But calculations by the EU and the German Ministry of the Environment indicate that the true cost of coal electricity is twice that. The soot from power plants is responsible for respiratory diseases, putting a financial strain on the healthcare system. The cost of electricity from modern power plants powered by other fossil fuels or nuclear power is also higher than that from land-based wind turbines.

Guaranteed price

Even though wind energy is already among the cheapest of energy sources, Gsänger believes it still needs political support in the form of a guaranteed rather than a higher price. A legally binding purchase price is needed before banks are prepared to offer credit. Gsänger named the example of Turkey: “There, the guaranteed price is lower than the market price. Nevertheless, the guarantee is necessary in order for banks to finance wind farms. And I see that as a prospect in other countries.”

Microcredit finance

The right financial tools are important if wind energy is to be successful. Unlike fossil-fuel power plants, the costs of wind energy are tied up above all in investment. In less developed regions, finance is a major problem – that’s why there’s scarcely any wind energy in many African nations.

As a way of dealing with that problem, Gsänger would like to see the use of microfinancing schemes, such as the Nobel Prize winner Mohammad Yunus has set up in Bangladesh, financing small wind turbines: “That means that businesses who supply the wind turbines also provide the credit. The electricity consumers then pay it back monthly but only have to pay once the turbines are delivering electricity.”

The logistics involved in offshore wind farms means the energy they produce is more expensive

Turbine trends

There have been major developments in wind turbine technology over the past few years. There are now taller wind turbines for low-wind regions and extra large rotor blades for greater efficiency. More offshore wind parks are also being built. The installation and maintenance of wind turbines at sea is expensive, costing 0.18 to 0.20 euros ($0.19-$0.25) per kilowatt hour – twice as much as for electricity produced from wind turbines on land.  

Another very different trend is that of small wind turbines for use in houses, small villages and industrial purposes. Over half a million turbines have been installed to date, the majority in the USA and China. Wind turbines are particularly cost effective for many people in developing countries and regions which would otherwise be unable to have electricity. Even users in developed countries increasingly benefit from using wind energy which is cheaper than that provided by most energy suppliers. Experts predict that the market for small wind turbine technology will grow significantly in the long-term.

Community-owned wind farms

Small turbines are being used in households and on a local level

Over half of all wind turbines in Germany are owned by local residents, farmers and local authorities. Hermann Albers, president of the German Wind Energy Association, believes that this has massively improved the acceptance of wind turbines among local communities as they directly profit from the sale of electricity.

The enthusiasm for large wind farms owned by private investors is nowhere near as strong, Albers told DW. Albers is himself a farmer and has established a number of community wind farms together with other farmers and local communities over the past 20 years. “Nowadays, we experience a high level of acceptance for community wind farms. In many cases, over half of the local population wants to invest in wind energy. People have really understood the opportunity it provides.”

The WWEA sees community-owned wind farms as the best way of speeding up the global introduction of environmentally friendly energy generation. Its upcoming World Wind Energy Conference, which is taking place in Bonn from July 3 to 5, has been given the motto: “Community Power – Citizen’s Power.”

Author: Gero Rueter / hw
Editor: Michael Lawton

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Green Energy Renewable Solutions Inc. (OTCBB: EWRL) stock closed its trading at $0.775 Thursday, up 68.46 percent from its previous close of $0.77. The stock opened at $0.60 and touched its lowest price point at $0.56. Its intraday high price stood at $0.79. The stock recorded the volume of 3.43 million shares, in comparison to average daily volume of 0.27 million shares. Green Energy Renewable Solutions has traded in the range of $0.03 and $0.81 in the previous 52 weeks. The company’s market cap stands at 24.21 million and the stock’s beta is 10.36.

Green Energy Renewable Solutions announced that it would be paying a stock dividend to its shareholders. The dividend would be paid in the ratio of one share for one stock unit already held. The company has set the record date at June 29, 2012. All the shareholders registered on the books of the company will receive a share in dividend for every share held by them. Green Energy Renewable Solutions’ board of directors has already approved the deal.

Green Energy Renewable Solutions also reported that it has inked a new deal with Disposal Specialties LLC. The company said that the contract will ensure the delivery of up to 1,000 tons of demolition and construction waste daily. This waste material will be processed at the company’s new Highland Park facility in Michigan. The company is expecting to achieve 85% recovery rate for its recycling operation. Joe DuRant, CEO of the company, said, “The Detroit Metro market is producing an average of over 10,000 tons of construction and demolition material daily.”

Green Energy Renewable Solutions announced that it expects the operations to commence soon at its Highland Park facility in Michigan. The company said that it has already cleared the site. Green Energy Renewable Solutions reported that the process of machinery installation has also been completed. The company is looking to start operations within 60 days.

Green Energy Renewable is a development stage company and is involved in the business of processing municipal solid waste. The company also processes and recycles waste material. Green Energy Renewable processed waste products to create energy. Green Energy Renewable is also contemplating an on-site waste processing plant. This plant will use demolition waste and processed construction waste to produce electricity. The company plans to sell such electricity to local municipalities and utilities. Green Energy Renewable is based out of Las Vegas, Nevada.


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As Ofgem’s revelation of soaring profit margins at the ‘Big Six’ energy firms brings good news to companies such as British Gas, it has caused uproar amongst homeowners across the country that are paying through the nose and over the odds for their energy bills.

Energy bills for consumers nationwide have risen dramatically in recent years with an average increase from £605 in 2004 to £1,060 in 2010. These ever-increasing gas and electricity prices are continuing to put pressure on UK living standards, and can be attributed to a lack of both supplier competition and production efficiency.

uSwitch, an independent energy advice company, has slammed the latest profit announcement from British Gas describing it as ‘scandalous’.

Alan Tattersall, Head of Home Services at the independent comparison and switching service said, “It is disgraceful that British Gas has been able to squeeze these scandalous profits out of their customers.”

“British Gas has used rising wholesale gas prices as a smokescreen to extract ever increasing margins of profit from their customers. These profits are as a direct result of the record price increases of up to 150* per year, that British Gas inflicted on their customers over the course of 2004.”

A study into the complex accounts of the large energy firms has unearthed a shocking discovery of the profits they make from UK customers – a colossal £168 per second.

Starting this summer, all suppliers will be forced to state their results in a way which makes them easier to compare, under new rules from regulator Ofgem.

Despite the clamp down, firms are still being allowed to persuade baffled homeowners to switch to tariffs which fail to save them money. One survey carried out by ‘Which?’ showed that salesmen in shopping centres routinely embellished on the benefits of changing suppliers which, more often than not, left customers on cheaper tariffs much worse off.

If you are concerned about how much you are paying on your energy bills, the best course of action to take is to visit a comparison website such as uSwitch with your current tariff, supplier and annual consumption. Simply input these values into the site and you’ll be provided with results showing you your best supplier and tariff.

670px Gas flame PD 150x150 Energy companies profit while consumers suffer

Gas Flame-by George Shuklin

Currently, many homeowners are also being caught out by underhand billing tricks, such as using daily ‘standing charges’ or higher charges on the first units they use. This ensures anyone cutting back on their energy use — as happened last winter — pays the highest charge per unit for as much of their energy as possible.

And the confusion does not end here. Many firms have a discount for customers paying by direct debit. But this discount may not be credited to accounts until the 12th month. This means that the supplier benefits immediately, but you have to wait a year for the discount to be taken into consideration. If you switch before then, you don’t get the discount.

For more details, visit an online comparison website.

Image by George Suklin (own work-public domain) via WikiMedia Commons


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DERBY, England, June 29, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ –
Utility Exchange, the business energy comparison site, say they have seen a dramatic uplift in businesses comparing energy prices online but that businesses could do more to reduce their energy costs.

Research by Siemens UK (The Green League Report) found that 79% of businesses say they take energy management seriously, although this figure is only 69% among energy managers. The report also found that 70% of organisations see reducing business energy costs as the main reason for undertaking energy management, while 22% of energy managers admitted they didn’t know what their business spent on energy annually.

Founder of Utility Exchange Online, Conway Standing, said “While we have experienced an increase in the number of small and medium sized businesses comparing energy prices online it’s still surprising how many businesses don’t look at reducing their energy costs by comparing energy prices.”

Many commentators suggest that high energy prices are set to stay and therefore it makes sense for businesses to actively seek to not only make their business more energy efficient but to ensure they are on the most appropriate deal.

Using an energy comparison site can help organisations to reduce energy costs. Reducing energy bills is just one factor involved in energy management but it can take up a lot of time. Utility Exchange also has dedicated account managers to not only compare prices but to manage the whole switchover process.

CEO at utility-exchange.co.uk, Adam White, said “One way of reducing business energy costs is to compare business electricity prices and business gas prices. We have a quick and easy 3 step process to compare the market and ensure you get the right deal for your business. A dedicated account manager will handle the switchover process for you”.

Notes to Editors:

For further information, please contact Adam White

Contact: Adam White, 0800-411-88-30, email: adam@utility-exchange.co.uk

SOURCE Utility Exchange Online

Copyright (C) 2012 PR Newswire. All rights reserved


CHICAGO, Jun 21, 2012 (GlobeNewswire via COMTEX) –
Power2Switch, the company that brings awareness of energy deregulation and enables residents to reduce energy costs by switching electricity providers, today launched its services in the state of New Jersey. The company’s website educates consumers about retail electricity and enables electricity customers to comparison shop for electricity providers free of charge and to save money on their electric bills.

Users simply visit Power2Switch.com, type in their ZIP code, and compare the rates, percentage of savings, electricity source and plan length from Commerce Energy and Champion Energy Services. Customers should expect an annual savings of up to 27% for traditional energy sources, or up to 15% for renewable (wind, solar) energy sources. The switch can be completed online in under ten minutes and is completely free. Customers may select twelve, twenty-four or thirty-six month contracts.

Although New Jersey’s electricity market has been deregulated since 1999, allowing consumers the right to choose a licensed, independent electric supplier with the lowest rate, only about 5% of New Jersey residential customers have switched to a less expensive electricity supplier. Power2Switch plans to help educate consumers about their right to choose electricity providers and save money.

“We’re very pleased to continue our growth and to now offer our services in New Jersey,” said Phil Nevels, COO and co-founder of Power2Switch. “Many people still haven’t realized that they have the right to choose their energy provider. Whether you choose renewable energy or traditional energy, you’ll pay less than you pay now.”

The Chicago-based Power2Switch has been operating in Illinois since 2010. The company also publishes numerous energy saving tips and market commentary on its blog. Power2Switch is currently running a “Free Electricity for a Year” sweepstakes open to new customers who switch their electricity provider through power2switch.com by July 6, 2012. One random winner will be selected to have their electricity bills paid for one full calendar year. Please read the complete official rules for more information.

About Power2Switch:

Power2Switch is the easiest way for residents and businesses to comparison-shop electricity suppliers and save money on their electric bills. Powered by an engaged and accessible customer service team, Power2Switch offers rates and plans for the largest variety of suppliers on one quick and convenient webpage. Part of the 2011 class at Excelerate Labs, Power2Switch was selected as one of five startups to participate in President Clinton’s 2011 Clinton Global Initiative and was chosen as one of the “Top 10 Up-and-Comers” at the Chicago Innovation Awards. Founded in 2010 by University of Chicago Booth School of Business graduates Seyi Fabode and Philip Nevels, Power2Switch is an Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) licensed broker agent consultant and is certified by the Better Business Bureau (BBB). For more information, please visit
https://power2switch.com/ .

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SOURCE: Power2Switch



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NEW YORK, June 27, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Biopellet Energy Market – Global Market Size, Average Price, Competitive Analysis and Key Country Analysis to 2020

http://www.reportlinker.com/p0910423/Biopellet-Energy-Market—Global-Market-Size-Average-Price-Competitive-Analysis-and-Key-Country-Analysis-to-2020.html#utm_source=prnewswireutm_medium=prutm_campaign=Energy

Biopellet Energy Market – Global Market Size, Average Price, Competitive Analysis and Key Country Analysis to 2020

Summary

The research provides an understanding of the biopellet markets. The report details about biopellet manufacturing technology along with the key drivers and challenges in the global biopellet market. The research provides historical and forecast analysis of the global biopellet production, average prices and market size. The report also provides the competitive landscape of major biopellet manufacturers. The similar information is also provided for seven countries which are spread across four regions; North America, Latin and Central America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The countries covered in the report are the US, Canada from North America; Brazil from South and Central America; Germany, Sweden and Austria from Europe; Japan from Asia-Pacific. Each of the country section consists of production, consumption, average price, market value, import-export analysis and competitive landscape.

The report is built using data and information sourced from primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalData’s Team of industry experts.

Scope

- Data on the Global biopellet production, average price and market value. Share of major countries in global production and consumption.

- Data on production, consumption, imports and exports for seven major countries across four regions. The countries covered are the US in North America; Germany, Sweden, Austria in Europe; Japan in Asia-Pacific; and Brazil in South and Central America.

- Competitive Landscape in the biopellet for the countries covered in the report.

- Key Drivers and Challenges for the development of biopellet market in the countries covered.

Reasons to buy

- Facilitate decision-making based on strong historic and forecast data for biopellet market.

- Develop strategies based on the various market developments in the biopellet industry.

- Position yourself to gain the maximum advantage of the biopellet industry’s growth potential.

- Identify key partners and business development avenues based on the understanding of the market movements of the major competitors in the biopellet market.

- Respond to your competitors’ business structure, strategy and prospects.

1 Table of Contents1 Table of Contents 31.1 List of Tables 51.2 List of Figures 62 Introduction 82.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Technology Definition 82.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Pelletization Technology 82.2.1 Raw Material 82.2.2 Raw Material Processing 82.2.3 Pellet Preprocessing 82.2.4 Pelleting Process 82.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Pellet Combustion Technologies 92.3.1 Pellet Stoves 92.3.2 Boilers 92.3.3 Burners 92.3.4 Medium and Large Scale Pellet Combustion Technologies 92.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Cost Analysis 102.5 GlobalData Report Guidance 113 Biopellet Energy Market, Global 123.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Overview 123.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production and Production Capacity, 2006 – 2011 123.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, 2006-2020 143.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Average Price, 2006 – 2020 163.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Market Value, 2006-2020 183.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production, Split by Country, 2011 203.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, Split by Country, 2011 213.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Comparison of Trade Flow between Countries, 2010 224 Biopellet Energy Market, The US 234.1 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Overview 234.2 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Production and Production Capacity, 2006 – 2011 254.3 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Consumption, 2006 – 2020 274.4 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Average Price, 2006-2020 284.5 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Market Value, 2006 – 2020 294.6 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Market Forces 304.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Key Drivers 304.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Key Challenges 304.7 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2010 314.8 Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Competitive Landscape 325 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada 345.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Overview 345.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Production and Production Capacity, 2006 – 2011 355.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Consumption, 2006 – 2020 365.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Average Price, 2006 – 2020 385.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Market Value, 2006 – 2020 405.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Market Forces 415.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Key Drivers 415.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Key Challenges 415.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2011 425.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Competitive Landscape 446 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany 466.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Overview 466.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Production and Production Capacity, 2006-2011 486.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Consumption, 2006-2020 496.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Average Price, 2006-2020 516.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Market Value, 2006-2020 536.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Market Forces 546.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Key Drivers 546.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Key Challenges 546.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2020 556.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Competitive Landscape 577 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden 597.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Overview 597.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Production and Production Capacity, 2006-2011 597.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Consumption, 2006 – 2020 607.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Average Price, 2006 – 2020 627.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Market Value, 2006 – 2020 637.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Market Forces 647.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Key Drivers 647.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Key Challenges 647.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2011 657.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Competitive Landscape 668 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria 688.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Overview 688.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Production and Production Capacity, 2006 – 2011 708.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Consumption, 2006 – 2020 718.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Average Price, 2006-2020 728.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Market Value, 2006 – 2020 748.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Market Forces 758.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Key Drivers 758.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Key Challenges 758.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2020 758.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Competitive Landscape 779 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan 799.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Overview 799.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Production and Production Capacity, 2006 – 2011 799.3 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Consumption, 2006 – 2020 809.4 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Average Price, 2006-2020 829.5 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Market Value, 2006-2020 849.6 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Market Forces 859.6.1 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Key Drivers 859.6.2 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Key Challenges 859.7 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Import-Export Analysis, 2006 – 2011 869.8 Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Competitive Landscape 8810 Appendix 9010.1 Abbreviations 9010.2 Bibliography 9010.3 Methodology 9110.3.1 Secondary Research 9110.3.2 Primary Research 9110.3.3 Definitions, Market Estimates and Assumptions 9210.4 Contact Us 9210.5 Disclaimer 92

List of Tables

Table 1: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 10Table 2: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 13Table 3: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 15Table 4: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 17Table 5: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 19Table 6: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production, Split by Country, %, 2011 20Table 7: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, Split by Country, %, 2011 21Table 8: Biopellet Energy Market, Comparison of Trade Flow between Countries, %, 2010 22Table 9: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Number of Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2001-2011 24Table 10: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 25Table 11: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Production Capacity by Region, kT, 2003-2009 26Table 12: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 27Table 13: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 28Table 14: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 29Table 15: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Import-Export Analysis, kT, 2006-2010 31Table 16: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Competitive Landscape 32Table 17: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 33Table 18: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Volume of Lumber Produced, cubic meter, 2004-2010 34Table 19: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 35Table 20: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 37Table 21: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 39Table 22: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 41Table 23: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Exports, kT, 2006-2011 42Table 24: Biopellet Energy Market, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 43Table 25: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Competitive Landscape 44Table 26: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 45Table 27: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2000-2011 47Table 28: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 48Table 29: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 50Table 30: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 52Table 31: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 54Table 32: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 55Table 33: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Exports, By Country, %, 2010 56Table 34: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Competitive Landscape 57Table 35: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 58Table 36: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 60Table 37: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 61Table 38: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 62Table 39: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 63Table 40: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Import-Export, kT, 2006-2011 65Table 41: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Competitive Landscape 66Table 42: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 67Table 43: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Bioenergy Consumption by End User Segment, %, 2010 68Table 44: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2000-2011 69Table 45: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 70Table 46: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 71Table 47: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 73Table 48: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 74Table 49: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 75Table 50: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Exports, By Country, %, 2010 76Table 51: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Competitive Landscape 77Table 52: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 78Table 53: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 80Table 54: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 81Table 55: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 83Table 56: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 84Table 57: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Imports, kT, 2006-2011 86Table 58: Biopellet Energy Market, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 87Table 59: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Competitive Landscape 88Table 60: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2011 89Table 61: Abbreviations 90Table 62: Bibliography 90

List of Figures

Figure 1: Biopellet Energy Market, Pellet Production, Cost Analysis 9Figure 2: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 12Figure 3: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 13Figure 4: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 15Figure 5: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 17Figure 6: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Production, Split by Country, %, 2011 19Figure 7: Biopellet Energy Market, Global, Consumption, Split by Country, %, 2011 20Figure 8: Biopellet Energy Market, Comparison of Trade Flow between Countries, %, 2010 21Figure 9: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Number of Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2001-2011 22Figure 10: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 24Figure 11: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Production Capacity by Region, kT, 2003-2009 25Figure 12: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 26Figure 13: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 27Figure 14: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 28Figure 15: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Import-Export Analysis, kT, 2006-2010 30Figure 16: Biopellet Energy Market, the US, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 32Figure 17: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Volume of Lumber Produced, cubic meter, 2004-2010 33Figure 18: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 34Figure 19: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 35Figure 20: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 37Figure 21: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 39Figure 22: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Exports, kT, 2006-2011 41Figure 23: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 42Figure 24: Biopellet Energy Market, Canada, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 44Figure 25: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2000-2011 45Figure 26: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 47Figure 27: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 48Figure 28: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 50Figure 29: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 52Figure 30: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 54Figure 31: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Exports, By Country, %, 2010 55Figure 32: Biopellet Energy Market, Germany, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 57Figure 33: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 58Figure 34: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 59Figure 35: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 61Figure 36: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 62Figure 37: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Import-Export, kT, 2006-2011 64Figure 38: Biopellet Energy Market, Sweden, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 66Figure 39: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Bioenergy Consumption by End User Segment, %, 2010 67Figure 40: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Pellet Heating Systems Installed, 2000-2011 68Figure 41: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 69Figure 42: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 70Figure 43: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 71Figure 44: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 73Figure 45: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 74Figure 46: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Exports, By Country, %, 2010 75Figure 47: Biopellet Energy Market, Austria, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2010 77Figure 48: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Production and Production Capacity, kT, 2006-2011 78Figure 49: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Consumption, kT, 2006-2020 79Figure 50: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Average Prices, $/Ton, 2006-2020 81Figure 51: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Market Value, $m, 2006-2020 83Figure 52: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Imports, kT, 2006-2011 85Figure 53: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Share of Imports, By Country, %, 2010 86Figure 54: Biopellet Energy Market, Japan, Share of Pellet Production Plants, By Size, %, 2011 87

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Biopellet Energy Market – Global Market Size, Average Price, Competitive Analysis and Key Country Analysis to 2020

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. -

With temperatures forecasted to top the century mark this
week, Duke Energy is well prepared to meet customers’
demand for electricity. It’s also an ideal time to take
some simple steps to stay cool and save money.

Energy-Saving Information

  • Keep your doors closed – According to Energy Star®,
    minimizing door traffic and sealing leaks around
    windows and doors with caulking or weather stripping
    can help save up to 10 percent on annual energy bills.

  • Close your curtains or blinds during the day – The U.S.
    Department of Energy found that this quick and easy
    step can help reduce heat gain inside your home by 45
    percent, which means your home stays cooler so your air
    conditioner doesn’t have to work as hard.

  • Bump up the thermostat- Adjusting your thermostat up a
    degree or two can keep you comfortable while reducing
    your energy consumption.

  • Use your microwave instead of the oven¬ – Not only will
    it cut down on excessive heat in the kitchen, a
    microwave uses 70 percent less energy than a regular
    electric oven.

For more energy-saving tips and information — including a
thermostat calculator that demonstrates possible savings -
visit http://www.duke-energy.com/.
Click the “residential” tab and select your state. Tips and
tools are available in the “Save Energy Money” section.

State-Specific Energy Efficiency Programs
CFLs – Carolinas / Ohio
Installing compact fluorescent light bulbs in your
six most-used lamps / fixtures can save up to $30 over the
lifetime of each bulb. Duke Energy customers who haven’t
yet received their free CFLs should visiting www.duke-energy.com/freecfls
or call 800-943-7585; option 1.

My Home Energy Report – Ohio / South Carolina
It’s a well-known fact that neighbors compare energy
bills, and this Duke Energy program makes the comparisons
easier for qualified customers in Ohio and South Carolina.

The “My Home Energy Report” is a customized, paper-based
energy usage report sent via U.S. mail to eligible
residential customers in Ohio and South Carolina. The
report groups like homes of similar size, age and location
(based on publicly available tax records) and compares the
customer’s usage to the average home and efficient homes
within the group. The comparison does not include any names
or personal information, simply data on energy usage. The
report does include targeted actionable tips and other
recommendations designed to help customers use energy more
efficiently and control their energy usage.

Smart $aver Incentives® – All States
Duke Energy offers rebates for tuning up or
installing  new heating and / or cooling systems and
for improving your home’s insulation and air ducts. The
rebates range from $200 to $600 depending on the state in
which you live and the upgrades you make. Find out what’s
available in your state by checking out our Smart$aver®
incentives on http://www.duke-energy.com/.

Understanding Your Energy Bill
For answers to billing questions, sign up for Duke Energy’s
Online Services at http://www.duke-energy.com/.
Once registered, customers have instant access to a variety
of useful tools and information, including a 13-month
billing history and comparative weather data from the
previous year. These records can help illustrate how
extreme temperatures fluctuations affect energy usage.

Online Services customers can also take advantage of
programs, such as Budget Bill (Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky)
and Equal Payment Plan (Carolinas), which help customers
manage monthly energy costs by offering predictable monthly
payments.

Ohio customers who have digital smart meters can also
access their hourly energy usage from their Online Services
Account. For more information, a video demonstration -
“Smart Meters Give YOU the Power” — is available on Duke
Energy’s YouTube channel —

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGJm5JqgnQwlist=PL5D71D5E051E93FFAindex=11feature=plpp_video)

Special Assistance Programs
Duke Energy’s Third Party Notification Program provides a
safety net to help prevent service interruptions for
nonpayment. Program participants can designate a relative,
friend, neighbor, agency or someone else to receive a copy
of their Duke Energy bill each month. The third party is
not responsible for paying the bill, but may be able to
help arrange for payment – helping avoid disconnection of
service.

The summer heat can pose serious health concerns,
especially for senior citizens or others with special
needs. Duke Energy encourages everyone to check on loved
ones and neighbors who may be susceptible to extreme
temperatures.

Headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., Duke Energy is a Fortune
500 company traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the
symbol DUK. More information about the company is available
on the Internet at: http://www.duke-energy.com/.

CONTACT:

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More than half of UK firms are worried about the financial impact of rising business electricity and gas bills, according to a new poll.

The survey by OnePoll found that although 51% of businesses were worried, less than 20% of businesses had made their finance teams responsible for energy tracking and management.

The survey questioned 500 business decision-makers from across the UK and found that just 19% were responsible for monitoring how much energy their organisation used.

In most cases the job fell to office managers, facilities managers, and reception or security staff. However, in 14% of firms no one was responsible for tracking or monitoring energy use

Julian Morgan, managing director of the Energy Advice Line, the UK’s leading price comparison and switching service for business electricity users, said the survey underscored the need for businesses to make their energy costs a higher priority.

With energy now a significant item of operational expenditure, firms needed to treat electricity and gas like any other essential business supply,” Mr Morgan said. “This meant carefully monitoring energy use and trimming waste where appropriate, and ensuring that the electricity tariffs being paid were the most competitive on the market.

“Businesses automatically make sure that their IT requirements or stationery, for example, offer the best value possible. However, most firms do not regard their business energy and gas supplies in the same way, and they are missing out on significant savings as a result.

“Scrutinizing the market for the best available deals, and ensuring that you never, ever just stay with the same supplier year after year, has the potential to save businesses hundreds or even thousands of pounds a year.

“The process can be time-consuming and complex but that’s where reliable and independent price comparison and switching services can help. We have the expertise to compare tariffs like-for-like and can therefore provide very accurate quotes.

“We also offer a free contract management service; our team of business energy experts provide ongoing support once we have got you on to the cheapest deal.”

The OnePoll research was commissioned to support the launch of Zeco Energy Manager, energy management software.

The Energy Advice Line is one of the UK’s leading business electricity price comparison and switching service exclusively for business. It has campaigned for utility companies to change their business energy contracts and billing arrangements to make it easier for firms to switch suppliers to get the best business electricity rates and gas deals.

Leading Australian energy comparison service GoSwitch.com.au has released a new ‘one-click’ price calculator that allows users to quickly determine the average power bill savings that can be made in their area.

Australia (PRWEB) June 27, 2012

The gas and electricity comparison calculator quantifies potential savings for customers in their nominated postcode by instantly comparing default energy prices with the cheapest rates available on the GoSwitch.com.au website.

This allows energy users to determine in one click whether there is potential for significant savings in their postcode, without having to disclose any further personal information. Customers can then choose whether they wish to receive a more comprehensive analysis and make the switch over the phone in just five minutes.

Since the deregulation of the energy markets in most Australian states, customers have the ability to choose their power provider and plan. Householders who don’t choose a plan are automatically allocated a default rate, which is generally the most expensive.

GoSwitch.com.au is Australia’s most popular price comparison service for electricity and gas. It allows households and businesses to conduct a customised search to find the best energy provider for their needs, and to change plans free of charge.

Unlike a broker, and some other so-called comparison services, GoSwitch.com.au is also impartial. GoSwitch.com.au endeavors to list every plan available in order of price, regardless of whether a retailer allows consumers to switch to them through GoSwitch.com.au or not (99 per cent of plans are listed).

To find out more or switch right now over the phone, please call 1300 107 074.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/6/prweb9641545.htm